Thursday, 10 August 2017

...talking {S}ensitive and {EX}tempore =>SEX



     It starts with those naughty feelings of strong ecstasy;
 then one wishes to stay and linger around this amazing fantasy;

    The word SEX when mentioned at times may sound absurd;
But you see, without SEX the world probably would have remained null and void;

      My point should be well understood so as not to confuse it;
To know about and appreciate sex is good but misconception of the subject (sex) will make you abuse it;

Funny but true; the best sex is the one we have in our minds, our imaginations;
      Although we may not tell, our thoughts do amazing things when we imagine sex activities, oh what a sensation!

But come to think of it, you don't want to go there because you are toying with addiction;
      Surprising, many become addicts and fanatics without indulging in the action, just by imagination;

 Well you probably don't want to hear this part, yeah!!! Nobody want to hear it either;
Truly sex is an amazing adventure, but ABSTINENCE is better.

Written by Ini Imeh aka Ginie
He is an undergraduate of civil engineering at Akwa Ibom State University
Follow on Instagram @ginie_gold

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Future untold.

Episode 2 : Despair
   
         Young girl get inside now! Officer Munachi yelled, she suddenly remembered her parents that left for work are not yet back. In despair she ran inside, picked up her phone and called her mum with tears in her eyes, mom are you okay? She asked, am fine, she replied hope everyone is safe? she asked. Danielle still worried inquired about the mom's safety again. Danielle, listen to me, am safe our office is surrounded by soldiers and the same applies to your dad, he called not quite long ago.
          Danielle is the first child, she is 16 years and 5 months and the only daughter of David Tamuno-Preye Emmanuel, an electrical engineer at Nuelz Petroleum, Oron while the mom, Phoebe is a nurse working at Krimex Hospital which is just 10 minutes drive from her dad's workplace. Danielle has 2 siblings, twin brothers Abiyah and Ted aged 10.
          Being a bit calm she went to the sitting room switched the television on tuned to various stations though she regretted later because all the headlines on all stations carried the caption " Nigeria in Chaos again after a 50 year rest". Calm down Elle, she said to herself, hope this ends soon she prayed.
           Few minutes later her phone rang, she allowed it for some few seconds so as to enjoy the melodious ringtone which was #SpeedyDarlington hit song #Bandadadang, she finally checked her phone it was James, the only guy in her life she feels so secured and connected with, he is always a sweetheart and the best boyfriend ever she thought to herself, stop thinking and pick up. Hello baby, she said, Hi sweetest, hope you are fine? He asked with so much concern in his voice, yes am fine she replied, a troop of soldiers are guarding my street. Hey you boy!!!  Were the words she heard over the phone, babe, I have to call you back some Nigerian soldiers are running towards me, so I'll have to... Kpar Kpar!!! you dey craze, who you dey call?? And a call disconnection followed immediately...

- James is forced to join the Nigerian Army which is in need of a stronger team to defeat the hundreds of thousands soldiers of secessionist state. James is now in the opposition.
 Will he survive it??

Episode 3 to be out soon.

#EmmahEtzBlog
Facebook: Emmah Etz blog
#KrimexEvents
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/krimexevents/
Instagram: krimex events
#TdeTechnologies
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tdetech/

The future untold.


 Episode 1: The encounter
      Gbom Gbom!!! was the sound Danielle heard about 2:45 pm in the afternoon, she ran outside and was shocked to see that a fighter jet in the Nigerian colors  was responsible for the bombing, Chimo!!! She shouted when she came to realize that the dreaded 2nd civil war she never prayed for after she has heard and read about the devastating effects of the first was here.
        Both in amazement, fear and curiosity she lingered outside for a few minutes and all she had heard next was a sound of two armoured tanks and sounds of the feet of soldiers she could not really ascertain their number at that instant, this added to her fear making her wish all she is seeing was just a dream.
          ` Eyimba Eh Nzogu Nzogu' was the war song the soldiers wearing the army camouflage with the bright colors of the the secessionist state of the land of the rising sun, in quick succession the song was changed to the anthem of the secessionist state "all hail...."
In no time a command was given by the commander of the battalion to take positions on her street.
           ' Stay in your houses' the commander said, we the gallant soldiers of the land of hope, the land devoid of marginalization and religious sentiments, the land of the rising sun promises to fight to the last drop of our blood to protect your lives and properties and we won't stop fighting till the victory is ours....


The story above is just my imagination. No hate or support for the reoccurrence of war or separation  meant.
#EmmahEtzBlog
#KrimexEvents@ Krimex Events(IG)
#TdeTechnologies

Facing Trump Subsidy Cuts, Health Insurance Officials Seek a Backup Plan

Photo
The summer meeting of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners on Monday in Philadelphia.CreditMark Makela for The New York Times
PHILADELPHIA — Congress is on vacation, but state insurance commissioners have no time off. They have spent the past three days debating what to do if President Trump stops subsidies paid to insurance companies on behalf of millions of low-income people.
For administration officials and many in Congress, the subsidies are a political and legal issue in a fight over the future of the Affordable Care Act. But for state officials, gathered here at the summer meeting of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, the subsidies are a more immediate, practical concern.
The insurance commissioners are frustrated with the gridlock in Washington, which they say threatens coverage for consumers and the solvency of some insurers. Without the payments, they say, consumers will face higher premiums in 2018, and more insurers will pull back from the individual insurance market.
Mr. Trump has repeatedly threatened to cut off the payments, which reimburse insurers for reducing the deductibles, co-payments and other out-of-pocket costs for low-income people.
If the government continues providing funds for the subsidies, insurers will have “a small profit,” said Craig Wright, the chief actuary at the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation. “If the subsidies are not funded, carriers would face the prospect of large financial losses, which could increase the risk to their solvency.”
“It could be very damaging,” Mr. Wright said. “Our market wouldn’t recover.”
With no guidance or clarity from the Trump administration, state officials are agonizing over what to do. Many expressed a sense of urgency, saying they needed to make decisions soon on rates to be charged in 2018.
Trump administration officials were invited to speak to state insurance regulators and were listed in the program for at least one public session, but they did not show up at that event to provide the promised update on federal policy.
“Most of us are hoping and praying that this gets resolved,” said David Shea, a health actuary at the Virginia Bureau of Insurance. “But that’s not the case right now.”
Without the federal subsidies, insurers would need to get the money — estimated at $7 billion to $10 billion next year — from another source. And that means higher premiums, state officials said.
The officials here are wrestling with several questions: How much should premiums be increased? Who should pay the higher premiums? Is there any way to minimize the effect on low-income people? Is it better to assume that the cost-sharing subsidy payments will or will not be made in 2018? What happens if state officials guess wrong?
State officials said they would allow insurers to impose a surcharge on premiums if the federal government cuts off funds for the cost-sharing subsidies.
Paul Lombardo, a health actuary at the Connecticut Insurance Department, said officials there might direct insurers to spread the cost across all of their health plans, both on and off the insurance exchange created under the Affordable Care Act.
Photo
Alfred W. Redmer Jr. at the meeting on Monday in Philadelphia. CreditMark Makela for The New York Times
By contrast, Florida has asked insurers to load all of the extra cost into the prices charged for midlevel “silver plans” sold on the exchange. The federal government would then absorb almost all of the cost through another subsidy program, which provides tax credits to help low-income people pay premiums, Mr. Wright said. The tax credits generally increase when premiums rise.
J. P. Wieske, the deputy insurance commissioner in Wisconsin, said that two companies, Anthem and Molina Healthcare, were leaving the state’s marketplace in 2018 and that two others, Humana and UnitedHealth, exited in previous years. As a result, he said, more people will be enrolled in smaller local health plans that could be more affected by a termination of federal subsidy payments.
“Carriers left in the Wisconsin market are smaller, local plans,” Mr. Wieske said. “Particular carriers could have huge surges in population, going from 7 or 8 percent of their business in the individual market to 30 or 40 percent. If that’s the case, if it’s 30 or 40 percent of their business in the individual market, that’s obviously a gargantuan risk.”
The risks for consumers are also high, Mr. Wieske said. “Consumers,” he said, “could be stuck in a zombie plan, an insurer that is essentially no longer able to do business in the worst-case scenario, or consumers may have to move to another insurer with different health care providers.”
Officials in many states must decide this month on insurance rates for next year.
“We are holding off making those decisions until the very last possible minute,” said Julie Mix McPeak, the Tennessee insurance commissioner. “In doing so, we are really making it difficult for consumers who need information about open enrollment — who’s participating in the market and what the rates might be. We don’t know the answers to any of those questions.”
The uncertainty stems not only from the White House and Congress, but also from federal courts.
House Republicans challenged the cost-sharing payments in a lawsuit in 2014. A federal judge ruled last year that the Obama administration had been illegally making the payments, in the absence of a law explicitly providing money for the purpose. The case is pending before the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, which has held it “in abeyance” at the request of House Republicans and the Trump administration.
The administration has been providing funds for cost-sharing subsidies month to month, with no commitment to pay for the remainder of this year, much less for 2018.
“I am very fearful that we’ll have insurers make a decision to leave markets as a result of the uncertainty,” said Ms. McPeak, who is the president-elect of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. “It’s somewhat inequitable to ask insurers to sign a contract that binds them but may not bind the federal government.”
The Affordable Care Act requires an annual review of health insurance rate increases, and states are taking different approaches.
Nebraska initially told insurers to file 2018 rates on the assumption that the cost-sharing subsidies would continue. But “because of the confusion in Washington,” said Martin W. Swanson of the Nebraska Insurance Department, the state later told insurers to assume that they would not receive the subsidy payments.
Mike Chaney, the Mississippi insurance commissioner, and Allen W. Kerr, the Arkansas insurance commissioner, said they had instructed companies to assume that they would receive the cost-sharing subsidies next year. Michigan has told insurers to submit two sets of rates, one with the subsidies and one without.
Michael F. Consedine, the chief executive of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, said that without a firm commitment of federal funds for the cost-sharing subsidies, “we have grave concerns about the long-term viability of the individual health insurance market in a number of states.”
“We need some step right away,” Mr. Consedine said, “either by action of Congress or by direction of the administration, to ensure that Americans continue to have access to coverage.”
source: NEW YORK TIMES.

Woman kills wife by shooting her in the face


A woman has been charged with fatally shooting her wife in the face in their New Jersey home, prosecutors and police said Monday.

Mount Holly police officers responded to Laura Bluestein’s home after a relative reported a possible assault Sunday, the Burlington County Prosecutor’s Office said.



Police found 29-year-old Felicia Dormans with a gunshot wound in the face at the home. She died at the scene,NYDaily reports.

Bluestein, 28, told investigators Dormans was her wife. A motive for the shooting is still under investigation.
Dormans’ Facebook profile says the couple had been married since 2016

FRANCE - No ‘first lady’ title for Brigitte Macron after petition over her status

The French president’s wife, Brigitte Macron, will not be given an official “first lady” title or her own budget, the French government has said following a petition against a proposed change to her status.




A “transparency charter” will be published in the next few days to clarify the position of Emmanuel Macron’s wife, but presidential aides insist her role will be strictly public and not political.

The Élysée has made no official announcement, but officials were forced to react after the petition opposed to the president’s spouse having an official title, status and budget was signed by more than 275,000 people in two weeks.

During his election campaign, Macron promised to “clarify” his wife’s role to “end the hypocrisy” over the situation. One of Macron’s first actions after taking power was to set up a working party to examine the “first lady” position.

A YouGov poll for the French edition of the Huffington Post in May suggested 68% of the French public was opposed to the head of state’s spouse being given an official role.
News Source: Gaurdian